Geotargeting in Marketing: What You REALLY Need to Know

Local marketing is becoming more important, whether you own a brick-and-mortar or whether you are solely digital. Geotargeting simply means using geography to target your market in a hyper-specific way. The first thing to do when employing this strategy is to establish your perimeter. So for example: Do you want a one-mile, three-mile, five-mile or 10-mile radius for your geotargeting? That will determine whether you want to reach consumers within a smaller or a larger radius.

Then, I think it’s really important that you research the types of locations that consumers have visited, so that you can better identify their buying behavior. Knowing the locations where consumers have visited can give you the means to accurately predict where they will be in the future, and that can help you optimize your geotargeting.

Another thing I think a lot of marketers miss is to optimize their landing pages to match their geotargeted ads. How? Let’s say that you’ve targeted wealthy teenagers for your ad selling a gadget. When those teenagers click on that ad, they should land on a page that is directly related to that gadget in the ad. If your ad goes to a general landing page, you are losing a prime opportunity to turn that visitor into a customer. Why? Because when consumers click on your ad and it doesn’t immediately land on the page where they can take advantage of that ad, they may not be inclined to look for that product or service. Make it easy on them and match the geotargeted ad to the appropriate landing page.

And finally, you shouldn’t forget that weather could play a huge role in your geotargeting strategy. For example, if you run a beach café, you may want to adjust your bids based on the weather, because when it’s sunny and hot, you are far more likely to have consumers who are receptive to your marketing.